Plot Structure – Novels & Stories [infographic]

Seeing as I was completely swamped with work last week, and didn’t post an infographic on Infographic Friday, I’m apologising by giving you not ONE infographic but THREE.

Plot structure? You got it. Here’s three viewpoints:

What insights do you have about plot structure? Are you all about the planning or the organic evolution? Share your views in the comments!

Plot Structure Infographic One: 6 Stage Plot Structure

ONE: Aristotle’s theory that the three part structure was the perfect plot structure (I’m blithely paraphrasing and simplifying here. If you feel like delving into Aristotle’s theories of tragedy, read Poetics).

Infographic Poster explaining Michael Hauge's Six Stage Plot Structure for screenwriting.
Infographic Poster explaining Michael Hauge’s Six Stage Plot Structure for screenwriting.

Plot Structure Infographic TWO: The Hero with a Thousand Faces

TWO: Joseph Campbell’s Hero of a Thousand Faces – basically, in all the stories of the world share a fundamental structure. George Lucas acknowledged his debt of gratitude to Campbell, whose seminal work aided him greatly when outlining the Star Wars trilogy.

The Hero with a Thousand Faces - The 17 stages of Joseph Campbell's MONOMYTH
The Hero with a Thousand Faces – The 17 stages of Joseph Campbell’s MONOMYTH

Plot Structure Infographic THREE: What makes a prize-winning novel?

THREE: Booker Prize-winning plotlines – a look at the structures of the novels that made the 2011 Booker Prize longlist.

You can view a really big version at Delayed Gratification.

How to write a Booker Prize-winning novel - Infographic outlining the plots of the 2011 Booker Prize shortlist
How to write a Booker Prize-winning novel – Infographic outlining the plots of the 2011 Booker Prize shortlist

3 thoughts on “Plot Structure – Novels & Stories [infographic]

  1. The 3rd infographic of plot lines reminds me of one of my high school English teachers. She summed up a description of literature as a novel about the suffering of life, with the ending depends on whether the author is an optimist or a pessimist. Don’t know where the escaped tiger fits in with that though!

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